Monday, January 29, 2007

Mr Compiler

After promising “Pi”, “Requiem for a Dream” and six years of silence, Darren Aronofsky presented “The Fountain” which was supposed to be an evolution of his style. Clearly, he has learnt a lot. The movie is an annoying compilation of very many known ideas and images: if you have seen “Little Buddha”, “Apocalypto”, some surrealistic stuff by Sokurov and Tarkovsky, images from the Hubble telescope, and a couple of historic soap operas, you can spend your weekend for something better than gazing at colourful kaleidoscope of well-compiled frames devoid of distinctive meaning. The movie is very secondary, both visually and philosophically.

I have already read some exalted reviews on the internet. They mean that some people have no good cinematographic education and, moreover, cannot distinguish beauty with sense and without. Ah yes, Mr Aronofsky’s camera does love his beautiful wife Rachel Weisz. If you like to watch without thinking, go on.

Astrologically, why is this movie such a compilation?

An overall potency of a talent can be read from chart luminaries. I see them as precious stones which need cut and facetting. The quality of the stone is defined by the dignity of the luminary, and the final beauty and brilliance are provided by the aspects which ‘facet’ the inborn power. An average stone can be well polished and presented in advantageous light, whereas the brightest stones can be spoilt and demolished by wrong cutting. In this chart, the luminaries are insignificant, but they are well facetted to provide a career of a successful compiler.

2 comments:

dorothy said...
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dorothy said...

"An overall potency of a talent can be read from chart luminaries. I see them as precious stones which need cut and facetting. The quality of the stone is defined by the dignity of the luminary, and the final beauty and brilliance are provided by the aspects which ‘facet’ the inborn power. An average stone can be well polished and presented in advantageous light, whereas the brightest stones can be spoilt and demolished by wrong cutting. In this chart, the luminaries are insignificant, but they are well facetted to provide a career of a successful compiler.

What a beautiful and apt analogy, Valerie. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Dorothy